Effect of feeding Moringa oleifera dried leaves on growth performance, blood biochemical status and economy of production in Barbari goats

Authors

  • Khairuddin Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel University of Agriculture and Technology, Meerut-250110, India
  • Ahmad Fahim Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel University of Agriculture and Technology, Meerut-250110, India
  • Rajbir Singh Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel University of Agriculture and Technology, Meerut-250110, India
  • Nazim Ali Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel University of Agriculture and Technology, Meerut-250110, India
  • Dev Saran Sahu Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel University of Agriculture and Technology, Meerut-250110, India
  • Amit Kumar Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel University of Agriculture and Technology, Meerut-250110, India
  • Debashis Roy Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel University of Agriculture and Technology, Meerut-250110, India

Keywords:

Barbari goats, Feed efficiency, Feeing economics, Growth performance, Moringa leaf meal

Abstract

A three-months feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effect of feeding Moringa oleifera leaves as replacement to concentrate in the ration of growing goat. Eighteen female Barbari goats of uniform age and conformation (16.65 ± 1.20 kg; 11 to 13 months) were divided randomly into three groups. The animals in control group (T1 ) were fed basal diet consisting of roughage and concentrate in equal proportion, whereas in treatment groups T2 and T3 the concentrate mixture was partially replaced with dried Moringa oleifera leaves at  05% and 10% levels, respectively. Significantly (P<0.01) higher average daily feed intake was recorded in T3 group compared to T and T groups. Mean daily body weight gain was significantly (P<0.01) higher in T3 group, than T2 and T1 . The biochemical parameters showed significant (P<0.01) lowering in blood cholesterol in T3  and a significant (P<0.05) elevation in total protein and globulin at the end of experiment. The cost-benefit analysis of dietary treatment showed that it was 0.79, 0.83 and 1.02 for T1 , T2 and T3 , respectively. It was concluded that dried Moringa oleifera leaves could replace up to 10% of concentrate in growing goats without impairing their performance and health status, while reducing the cost of feed.

Uploaded

20-12-2023

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Articles