Novel multiple gynoecium genotype in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.)

Authors

  • Indu ICAR-Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute, Jhansi-284003, India
  • Maneet Rana ICAR-Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute, Jhansi-284003, India
  • Rajesh K. Singhal ICAR-Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute, Jhansi-284003, India
  • Nilamani Dikshit ICAR-Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute, Jhansi-284003, India
  • Sultan Singh ICAR-Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute, Jhansi-284003, India
  • Mahesha H. S. ICAR-Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute, Jhansi-284003, India
  • Shahid Ahmed ICAR-Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute, Jhansi-284003, India
  • Amaresh Chandra ICAR-Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute, Jhansi-284003, India

Keywords:

Floral biology, Multiple gynoecium, Sorghum, Triple seed, Twin seed

Abstract

A novel fodder sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) genotype (EC484238) with multiple gynoecium has been identified at ICAR-IGFRI, Jhansi for the first time in India. The floral microscopic study of this novel genotype revealed that female mega-gametophyte produced multiple gynoecium ranging from two to six, instead of one as in normal sorghum genotypes with bi-feathery stigma on each ovary. These multiple ovaries succeeded to produce viable twin or triplet seeds per spikelet per panicle. The twin and triple seed ratio ranged from 97-99% and 1-3%, respectively per panicle. This unique sorghum genotype might be a homeobox mutant which could shed light on the genetic regulation and control mechanisms governing the development of floral structure in sorghum as well as in other grasses of the Poaceae family. Multi-ovary sorghum has the obvious advantage of the increased number of seeds per panicle, thereby potentially increasing the seed yield. The novel genotype might be used in future fodder sorghum breeding programmes and will have more significance for the development of dual purpose fodder sorghum.

Uploaded

20-12-2023

Issue

Section

Short Communication